SciFan: books and links for the science fiction fan

  search by writer, book or series:
   
 writers & series: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
home | about | links | e-mail 
 
   Lost Continent (s), The, by C. J. Cutcliffe Hyne  
 
  Novel, first publication in November 1899 , latest edition in November 2002
 
  New to SciFan?
SciFan is dedicated to helping you discover new fantasy and SF books:
  • our database of 40,000+ books is cross-referenced by author, series and theme and is updated almost daily
  • we cover new and forthcoming books like no one else [more about us.]

  •  
     
      Buy it online  
     


    Get most new and used editions at Amazon.com, Amazon Canada , Amazon UK or Powells

    Look for second-hand books at Biblio


    Buy Lost Continent (s), The by C. J. Cutcliffe Hyne
     
     
       Additional Information  
     
      from Cutliffe Hyne's PREFATORY: THE LEGATEES OF DEUCALION We were both of us not a little stiff as the result of sleeping out in the open all that night, for even in Grand Canary the dew-fall and the comparative chill of darkness are not to be trifled with. For myself on these occasions I like a bit of a run as an early refresher. But here on this rough ground in the middle of the island there were not three yards of level to be found, and so as Coppinger proceeded to go through some sort of dumb-bell exercises with a couple of lumps of bristly lava, I followed his example. Coppinger has done a good deal of roughing it in his time, but being a doctor of medicine amongst other things--he takes out a new degree of some sort on an average every other year--he is great on health theories, and practises them like a religion.
    There had been rain two days before, and as there was still a bit of stream trickling along at the bottom of the barranca, we went down there and had a wash, and brushed our teeth. Greatest luxury imaginable, a toothbrush, on this sort of expedition.

    "Now," said Coppinger when we had emptied our pockets, "there's precious little grub left, and it's none the better for being carried in a local Spanish newspaper."

    "Yours is mostly tobacco ashes."

    "It'll get worse if we leave it. We've a lot more bad scrambling ahead of us."

    That was obvious. So we sat down beside the stream there at the bottom of the barranca, and ate up all of what was left.

    ***

    from Edgar Rice Burroughs' introductory:

    Since earliest childhood I have been strangely fascinated by the mystery surrounding the history of the last days of twentieth century Europe. My interest is keenest, perhaps, not so much in relation to known facts as to speculation upon the unknowable of the two centuries that have rolled by since human intercourse between the Western and Eastern Hemispheres ceased--the mystery of Europe's state following the termination of the Great War--provided, of course, that the war had been terminated.

    From out of the meagerness of our censored histories we learned that for fifteen years after the cessation of diplomatic relations between the United States of North America and the belligerent nations of the Old World, news of more or less doubtful authenticity filtered, from time to time, into the Western Hemisphere from the Eastern.

    Then came the fruition of that historic propaganda which is best described by its own slogan: "The East for the East-- the West for the West," and all further intercourse was stopped by statute.

    Even prior to this, transoceanic commerce had practically ceased, owing to the perils and hazards of the mine-strewn waters of both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Just when submarine activities ended we do not know but the last vessel of this type sighted by a Pan-American merchantman was the huge Q 138, which discharged twenty-nine torpedoes at a Brazilian tank steamer off the Bermudas in the fall of 1972. A heavy sea and the excellent seamanship of the master of the Brazilian permitted the Pan-American to escape and report this last of a long series of outrages upon our commerce. God alone knows how many hundreds of our ancient ships fell prey to the roving steel sharks of blood-frenzied Europe. Countless were the vessels and men that passed over our eastern and western horizons never to return; but whether they met their fates before the belching tubes of submarines or among the aimlessly drifting mine fields, no man lived to tell.

     
     
      Related theme(s)  
     
     
  • Lost Civilizations

  •  
    1998-2010 Olivier Travers & Sophie Bellais - All Rights Reserved