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   Back When We Were Grownups, by Anne Tyler  
 
  Novel, first publication in 2001
 
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    Buy Back When We Were Grownups by Anne Tyler
     
     
       Additional Information  
     
      The first sentence of Anne Tyler's 15th novel sounds like something out of a fairy tale: "Once upon a time, there was a woman who discovered she had turned into the wrong person." Alas, this discovery has less to do with magic than with a late-middle-age crisis, which is visited upon Rebecca Davitch in the opening pages of Back When We Were Grownups. At 53, this perpetually agreeable widow is "wide and soft and dimpled, with two short wings of dry, fair hair flaring almost horizontally from a center part." Given her role as the matriarch of a large family--and the proprietress of a party-and-catering concern, the Open Arms--Rebecca is both personally and professionally inclined toward jollity. But at an engagement bash for one of her multiple stepdaughters, she finds herself questioning everything about her life: "How on earth did I get like this? How? How did I ever become this person who's not really me?"
    She spends the rest of the novel attempting to answer these questions--and trying to resurrect her older, extinguished self. Should she take up the research she began back in college on Robert E. Lee's motivation for joining the Confederacy? More to the point, should she take up with her college sweetheart, who's now divorced and living within easy striking range? None of these quick fixes pans out exactly as Rebecca imagines. What she emerges with is a kind of radiant resignation, best expressed by 100-year-old Poppy on his birthday: "There is no true life. Your true life is the one you end up with, whatever it may be." A tautology, perhaps, but Tyler's delicate, densely populated novel makes it stick.

    Yes, Poppy. There are also characters named NoNo, Biddy, and Min Foo--the sort of saccharine roll call that might send many a reader scampering in the opposite direction. But Tyler knows exactly how to mingle the sweet with the sour, and in Back When We Were Grownups she manages this balancing act like the old pro she is. Even the familiar backdrop--shabby-genteel Baltimore, which resembles a virtual game preserve of Tylerian eccentrics--seems freshly observed. Can any human being really resist this novel? It is, to quote Rebecca, "a report on what it was like to be alive," and an appealingly accurate one to boot.

    Source: James Marcus, Amazon.com.

    At 53, Rebecca Davitch, mistress of the Open Arms, a crumbling 19th-century row house in Baltimore where giving parties is the family business, suddenly asks herself whether she has turned into the wrong person. Is she really this natural-born celebrator, joyous and outgiving?

    Certainly that's how Joe Davitch she her 30-some years ago. And that's why this large-spirited older man, a divorcee with three little girls, swept her into his orbit. Before she knew it, she was embracing his extended family (plus a child of their own) and hosting endless parties in the ornate, high-ceilinged rooms where people paid to celebrate their family occasions in style. But can Beck (as she is known to the Davitch clan) really recover the person she left behind? A question that touches us all, and one that Anne Tyler explores with characteristic humor and wisdom in a novel one wishes would never end.

     
     
      Related theme(s)  
     
     
  • 20th Century
  • Earth
  • U.S.A.
  • Women - Feminism - Gender Issues

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